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Draw a Map

Create Your Own Map

Community members are able to create their own maps via two map-drawing tools. 

  1. Paper-only maps
  2. A powerful, but also complicated, online map-drawing tool

You can approach the map-drawing process in several ways! You can draw the borders of your neighborhood and indicate whether you want it united in one trustee area or if you want your neighborhood to be part of multiple trustee areas. You can draw a proposed trustee area, or even sketch an entire map of the five trustee areas. 

Also, you can provide feedback on draft maps that have been previously shared. 

Draw whatever you would like the Board of Education to consider and submit it to SRCS@NDCresearch.com. The District’s demographic consultants will generate the population and other demographic details for your proposed map, and make sure that the Board receives a copy.

Read below to learn more about the two mapping tools...

Paper-Only Maps

The simplest approach to drawing a map proposal is to draw your proposed map on any map of San Rafael, or you can use the participation kit map in English or in Spanish to draw your proposed districts and calculate the total population.

Submit your paper map: You can submit your map for the Board to consider to SRCS@NDCresearch.com. You can even snap a picture and email it straight from your mobile device. Alternatively, you can drop off your map to the Superintendent's Office at 310 Nova Albion Way.

Online Mapping Tool

The Online Map-Drawing Tool enables you to draw trustee areas Census block by Census block, just like professional demographers do. You can fine-tune your trustee area lines and see, in detail, the resulting demographics as you draw your map. 

But with this power comes complexity: this tool can be challenging to figure out at first. So before you log in, be sure to review the following helpful guides.

Also, there is a demo video for how to use the tool for SRCS. Click here to view the demo video

 

CLICK HERE FOR THE ONLINE MAPPING TOOL

Interactive Public Participation Kit Supplement

If you want to see exactly where the various Population Unit boundaries are located, or if you have difficulty reading the small print on the 8.5×11 PDF files, you can use this interactive map to zoom in and out on the Population Unit boundaries, and switch back and forth between PopUnit ID number labels and total population labels.. It works like Google Maps, except you use check-boxes to choose what layers and labels you want to see on the map. (Once they are released, the Draft Maps will also appear as layer options on this same map.)

CLICK HERE FOR THE INTERACTIVE MAP RESOURCE

Map Drawing Tips

When drawing a map, what criteria should you use? Many factors could be considered, but an equal population among the five trustee areas is one of the most important components.

In a map with five trustee areas, the ideal population size is 14,260 people. Additionally, the largest and smallest districts must be within 1,426 people of each other in total population.

Other factors to consider include the following:

  • Consider communities of interest
  • Be compact
  • Be contiguous
  • Have visible (natural and man-made) boundaries
  • Include respect for past voter selections